Category Archives: History of Gerontology

Phd and Postdoc Positions “Framing Age in the 19th and 20th century”

Framing Age (FRAMAG) is a three-year research program at the University of Luxembourg analysing how “ageing” was apprehended as a social and political problem during the 19th and 20th centuries (for more information click here).

FRAMAG

  • offers a three-year grant for a PhD student in the field of History of Medicine. The aim is to write a PhD dissertation on the mechanisms of institutional care of old people in the 19th and 20th century. The monthly salary is of €2000,- (tax free) plus an allowance for special expenses and travel. Applicants should have a Masters degree in a relevant subject area such as social science, history or philosophy of science. A special expertise and/or interest in the history of medicine or a related field are preferable. He/she must have a good command of the English, French and/or German languages. To fill in your application, click here.
  • offers a three-year grant for a Post-doc in the field of Sociology of Public Problems. The aim is to work on the social construction of old age in the last 10 years. The monthly salary is of €3500 (tax free) plus an allowance for special expenses and travel. Applicants should have a PhD  in a relevant subject area such as sociology, anthropology, political science… He/she must have a good command of the English, French and/or German languages. To fill in your application, click here.

Benoit Majerus

Since January 2011, I am working as Associate Professor at the University of Luxembourg. I have written my PhD on the occupation of Belgium during World War One and World Two. In 2013 I published a history of psychiatry in the 20th century from below. I am also co-editor of h-madness.

More Posts

FRAMAG

Last week, I got a positive answer from the FNR, the Luxembourgish National Research Fund, for my research project Framing Age (FRAMAG). Below an extract of my argumentation:

Framing age intends to analyse how “ageing” was apprehended as a social and political problem during the 19th and 20th centuries. It will follow the constantly changing lines of argument with regard to what is considered normal ageing, optimal ageing or pathological ageing (Rowe & Kahn, 1987). The project raises the question of what are the scientific and political elements in the construction and mobilisation of “old age” as a public problem. This project will thus help forging a new historiographical and sociological field in Luxembourg but it is also innovative on a European level. Its interdisciplinary and multi-scale view (local, national and transnational) will allow a critical re-questioning of and on the intersection of knowledge (gerontology), power (state) and practice (institutional care).

Beyond this specific disciplinary logic, the historical and sociological perspective, by taking a comparatively distanced perspective, also permits a broader reflection on a theme, which is now considered central to the organisation of societies, namely the challenges induced by an ageing population. In Luxembourg (Leduc, 2006) and in Europe, these challenges are considered particularly crucial for the evolution of the social cohesion and the financing of the welfare state. It will thus provide knowledge that will be of crucial importance to social policy for elderly people in Western societies, a particularly sensitive issue in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, based on its peculiar demographic structure (Fehlen, 2009).

The interest to study the link between institutional practice, public policy and knowledge production reflects the “performative” force of the latter in modern society. In the second half of the 19th century, an important transformation took place affecting all Western nations: the appropriation of the social by science (i.e., Verwissenschaftlichung des Sozialen (Raphael, 1996)). From this moment on, scientists aimed to identify, interpret, manage and resolve problems caused by social crises according to the rules and quality criteria of science. Especially medical knowledge had legitimacy to articulate old age in the early 20th century because it had already offered “answers” for other social problems such as dealing with diseases, industrialization, crime, urbanisation… With its vocabulary, with its expertise based on scientific legitimacy, it thus gave “meanings” to ageing as well. A “scientification” of the social sphere through (medical) knowledge is observed in its function of expertise, in its participation in the process of political articulation and finally through the dissemination of its categories and its paradigms in society.

The project will address the issues of “framing age” (Rosenberg, 1992) in an interdisciplinary manner – political science, sociology and history – and varying scales and chronology. Given the vastness of the subject, this project does not intend to present an overall image of the “invention of old age as a public issue” but provides three case studies:

1. A historical analysis on a transnational level (Germany and France) of the production of a particular theoretical knowledge.

2. A sociological and political analysis at the national level namely Luxembourg.

3. A historical analysis of local practices of care in a psychiatric hospital.

The project deciphers the “making” of age through an entangled history of spaces and temporalities.

1. Gerontology in Western Europe from the 1950s to 1980s

Geriatrics, gerontology, gerontopsychiatry… are all terms for a new scientific field that became essentially structured after the Second World War, and that documents the constitution of old age as a new scientific subject. It participated in an important redefinition of old age from pauperism towards “care”, a transformation initially accompanied by a certain pathologising.

Using a comparative approach, the project aims to analyse how ideas and practices have been developed in two countries, France and Germany, which have important but different scientific traditions and that have been largely neglected until now by historiography. The comparative approach implicit in the project (Kaelble, 1999) will attach a particular attention to the history of transfers (Espagne & Werner, 1988) and entangled histories (Werner & Zimmermann, 2004). It is not without reason that the synchronic comparative history has been criticized for its strong national framework, the comparison being often limited to a mere juxtaposition of national histories. The history of transfers and entangled history are variations of a common effort to bring greater reflexivity in this methodological choice and further treat exchange processes and interconnections, synchronic as well as diachronic. In a history of science, where the circulation of knowledge is a central part, the transgression of national boundaries is essential.

Based on the notion of “thought collective” introduced by Ludwik Fleck (Fleck, 1980) and “scientific paradigm” developed by Thomas Kuhn (Kuhn, 1996), the project will determine the conditions from which a particular theoretical and clinical knowledge arises, spreads and is challenged. Why psychologists, psychiatrists, biologists or sociologists call themselves at a certain moment “gerontologists”? How did gerontology become a profession (Freidson, 1970)? How are the methods for establishing “scientific knowledge” constructed and legitimised? What are the “boundary objects” (Loewy, 1992) that allow different disciplines involved in the invention of gerontology to share theories and practices? Finally, how does this knowledge circulate and how is it used (Cambrosio, Keating, & Mogoutov, 2004)?

The sources for this part of this project will be triple. First, scientific discourses published in academic journals and textbooks indicate an initial chronology of the emergence of gerontology. At the same time, the scientific criteria of this new discipline and the definition of this dynamic new field will emerge. Beyond these academic discourses, this project will also use the archives of major institutions often born in the second part of the 20th century and which moulded the creation of new knowledge: journals as the Revue de Gériatrie, organisations as the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Alternsforschung/Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gerontologie und Geriatrie or major research units such as the Institut für Gerontologie (Heidelberg).

2. Making policy for the elderly people today in Luxembourg

The issue of ageing is closely related to the creation of social policy initiatives whether private or public, among others in the early retirement schemes. As we have seen, the institutional care was primarily defined around a class approach: through the 19th and early 20th assisted seniors equal poor seniors. Over the last 100 years, we assist at an empowerment of age as a specific issue (Lenoir, 1979). This is reflected in all European countries by the establishment of specific ministerial departments that became important actors in the construction, the promotion and the treatment of the social problem of “ageing”.

The main goal of this constructivist sociological and socio-historical approach is to understand the mechanisms and to identify the actors that influence significantly the public problem and policy making in an European country, which has certainly various specificities (e.g., small size, multiculturalism, age structure…), but is also confronted to similar challenges than the rest of Europe.As in other countries (Bihan-Youinou, 2010), the policy for the elderly in Luxembourg is not a homogeneous public sector intervention but involves several state apparatuses (social security, employment, health…). However a ministry, namely the Ministry of Family, plays a major role.

This ministry that exists under that name since 1951 (Thewes, 2007) includes a specific section entitled “Service for older people”/“Policy for the elderly people” since 1989. This is the only department in Luxembourg that specifically address ageing. Thus, it occupies a nodal function in decision-making. Its central position is reinforced by the fact that it oversees the Superior Council of the Elderly, established in 1976. This administration must negotiate several inherent tensions in the “factory of social policies” (Lafore, 2010): between European, national and local level, between medicine, social intervention and public health, between private and public actors. Without neglecting the issue of the mobilisation of non-state actors, we aim to engage with the state as actor. In this context, Howard Becker’s work on “moral entrepreneurs” who define and promote social problems remains central contribution (Becker, 1966). Indeed, among “moral entrepreneurs”, state actors appear not only as objects put under pressure by politicians, NGOs and academics but as active subjects. From this specific point of view, this study will allow to determine how the department negotiates to impose its theme at a ministerial level, where it competes with other departments and how it is committed on a political and societal level to a “competition” from public scrutiny. This interior view claims that a state institution has also its own logic (B. Majerus, 2007) and interest to produce “public issues”.

3. From pauperism to medical care: elderly people at the Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital (19th-20th centuries)

Long before ageing became a public issue in the 1950s, institutions hosted within their walls elderly people who could no longer live in the community for various reasons (Gorsky, Harris, & Hinde, 2006) (Bridgen, 2001). During the 19th century and part of the 20th century, they were supported through a policy of assistance to the poor.

First, this research focuses on the discourses and practices used before ageing becomes a public concern. Second, it analyses changes in the daily practice of an institution due to changes in scientific paradigms – the creation of a specific medical field – and public policy – from the 1950s onwards in Luxembourg. This should allow a critical reappraisal of numerous sociological and historical narratives on gerontology that only start in the second half of the 20th century. This part is essential to give an historical depth to the two afore-mentioned projects.

As object of investigation, we chose the current Centre Hospitalier Neuro-Psychiatrique (CHNP) for two reasons. It is a central device in the social policy of Luxembourg and that as early as the mid-19th century. It is the only institution in Luxembourg that ensures an archival continuity for 150 years.

Created in 1855 as Hospice central, this institution enclosed and isolated in its beginnings various forms of marginality before being transformed in 1901 in a Maison de Santé. Despite this terminological change, Ettelbréck continued to be for a long time rather a hospice than a hospital. In 1931, the first open service was created. In 2005, the institution was transformed into three units: psychiatric rehabilitation centre, care centre for elderly people and home for people with intellectual disabilities (Centre Hospitalier Neuro-Psychiatrique: 150 Joër (1855-2005), 2005; J.-M. Majerus, 2009). If the CHNP has therefore recognized through its internal reorganisation the specificity of gerontology, it has done so only recently. From its beginnings, the CNHP was an institutional setting, along with other establishments, designated to manage an elderly population that no longer found its place within family structures. Several studies abroad have shown how central this particular institutional setting was for the “problematisation” of age from the second half of the 19th century onwards (G. Grob, 1983; B. Majerus, soumis; Vijselaar, 2010). From this perspective, the CHNP is a revealing case study for the various changes taking place at a national and international level: it reveals the local processes of the transformations taking place at other levels. The study can therefore answer the question that has recently attracted a particular interest in humanities i.e. how theoretical knowledge is applied in practice by professionals.

For this study, we propose to focus on an analysis of patients’ records kept since 1855 at the CHNP. Like the police, courts’ and prisons’ archives, patients’ records are considered as the royal road to access the “reality” of the unknown in history, although some disillusionment is palpable in recent years (Condrau, 2007; Porter, 1985). Keeping records of patients is relatively recent: it was not until the early 20th century that medical writing is structured around the individual patient. Intended for a “entre-nous professionnel” (Lae, 2008), these archives are especially rich: the heterogeneity of the records offers a view that allows a fascinating and multispectral gaze.

By combining these three gazes, Framing Age will provide a detailed picture of various developments by describing, analysing and especially confronting significant case studies which cover a wide geographical area and a large time line. The results will not only trace how different “ways of knowing” (Pickstone, 2001) meet, compete and/or reinforce themselves but will also allow to understand the demographic and societal changes, which applies to the European society and furthers the discussion on the methodological and theoretical construction of public problems.

Benoit Majerus

Since January 2011, I am working as Associate Professor at the University of Luxembourg. I have written my PhD on the occupation of Belgium during World War One and World Two. In 2013 I published a history of psychiatry in the 20th century from below. I am also co-editor of h-madness.

More Posts

Séminaire: Socio-histoire des interventions médico-sociales en Europe

Le vieillissement est une des problématiques médico-sociles les plus discutées au 20e siècle. L’affiche ci-dessus vient d’une campagne de l’ONG britatnnique Age Concern.

 

 

3e mardi du mois de 9 h à 12 h (salle des artistes, 96 bd Raspail 75006 Paris), du 16 octobre 2012 au 21 mai 2013

Les interventions médico-sociales ont été développées au XXe siècle pour répondre aux besoins de populations présentant une intrication de problèmes médicaux et de difficultés sociales et elles se sont imposées dès lors comme un enjeu important des politiques publiques. Historiquement, cependant, le périmètre de ces interventions a considérablement varié, incluant des questions allant selon les époques de la tuberculose au vieillissement pathologique et au handicap en passant par la maladie mentale. Ce séminaire de recherche vise à explorer les dynamiques de constitution de ce champ et ses transformations jusqu’à aujourd’hui. L’une des hypothèses que nous explorerons est que les contours du médico-social reflètent non seulement les problématisations des questions concernées mais également de façon plus générale les modes de régulations des politiques sociales et leur articulation à la médecine. Nous chercherons particulièrement à comprendre quelles sont les raisons des difficultés de l’institutionnalisation de ces interventions dans les systèmes de santé.

Pour aborder ces questions ce séminaire associera sociologie, histoire et science politique. Nous chercherons à comprendre quels ont été les acteurs de ce champ, analyser comment les savoirs médicaux ont été travaillé en même temps qu’ils ont travaillé ces interventions, à mettre en évidence la mobilisation des expertises dans l’espace public. Nous prêterons une attention particulière au rôle de la prévision dans la mise en forme de ces problèmes – assurances, planification, projection. Enfin ce séminaire développera une réflexion comparée sur les façons dont ces questions ont été abordées dans différents pays d’Europe.

Dans un premier temps plusieurs séances seront consacrées à une série de thèmes transversaux – « problème public », « expertise », « projection »… – avant de proposer dans un second temps des analyses portant sur des domaines spécifiques – vieillissement, psychiatrie…

Nicolas Henckes (chargé de recherche au CNRS, CERMES3, henckes@vjf.cnrs.fr) et Benoît Majerus (maître de conférences à l’Université du Luxembourg, benoit.majerus@uni.lu)

Programme

1ère séance – 16 octobre 2012

Nicolas Henckes. Les métamorphoses du secteur médico-social en France. Un cadre d’analyse

2e séance – 20 novembre 2012

Benoît Majerus. La construction des problèmes publics.

3e séance – 18 décembre 2012

Nicolas Henckes. Mesurer, standardiser et intervenir. Les nouvelles médicalisations du social

4e séance – 15 janvier 2013

Adrien Minard. (Sciences Po) Maladies vénériennes. La fin du péril vénérien ? Déclin et reconfigurations de la lutte contre la syphilis en France (1945-années 1960)

5e séance – 19 février 2013

Nicolas Henckes. Maladies mentales. Retour sur La gestion des risques

6e séance – 19 mars 2013

Benoît Majerus. Vieillissement (1). Saisir l’âge par les études longitudinales

7e séance – 16 avril 2013

Séance commune avec le séminaire « Handicap et sciences sociales » organisé par J.F. Ravaud, I. Ville et M. Winance. Handicap. Quelle place dans les politiques médico-sociales.

8e séance – 21 mai 2013

Tiago Moreira. (Durham University) Vieillissement (2). Ageing in technological democracies

Benoit Majerus

Since January 2011, I am working as Associate Professor at the University of Luxembourg. I have written my PhD on the occupation of Belgium during World War One and World Two. In 2013 I published a history of psychiatry in the 20th century from below. I am also co-editor of h-madness.

More Posts

Socio-histoire des interventions médico-sociales en Europe

L’année prochaine j’animerai avec Nicolas Henckes (CERMES) un séminaire à l’EHESS consacré à une socio-histoire des interventions médico-sociales en Europe. Ci-dessus la description du cours, le programme suivra dès qu’il sera fixé.

Les interventions médico-sociales ont été développées au XXe siècle pour répondre aux besoins de populations présentant une intrication de problèmes médicaux et de difficultés sociales et elles se sont imposées dès lors comme un enjeu important des politiques publiques. Historiquement, cependant, le périmètre de ces interventions a considérablement varié, incluant des questions allant selon les époques de la tuberculose au vieillissement pathologique et au handicap en passant par la maladie mentale.
Ce séminaire de recherche vise à explorer les dynamiques de constitution de ce champ et ses transformations jusqu’à aujourd’hui. L’une des hypothèses que nous explorerons est que les contours du médico-social reflètent non seulement les problématisations des questions concernées mais également de façon plus générale les modes de régulations des politiques sociales et leur articulation à la médecine. Nous chercherons particulièrement à comprendre quelles sont les raisons des difficultés de l’institutionnalisation de ces interventions dans les systèmes de santé.
Pour aborder ces questions ce séminaire associera sociologie, histoire et science politique. Nous chercherons à comprendre quels ont été les acteurs de ce champ, analyser comment les savoirs médicaux ont été travaillé en même temps qu’ils ont travaillé ces interventions, à mettre en évidence la mobilisation des expertises dans l’espace public. Nous prêterons une attention particulière au rôle de la prévision dans la mise en forme de ces problèmes – assurances, planification, projection. Enfin ce séminaire développera une réflexion comparée sur les façons dont ces questions ont été abordées dans différents pays d’Europe.
Dans un premier temps plusieurs séances seront consacrées à une série de thèmes transversaux – « problème public », « expertise », « projection »…- avant de proposer dans un second temps des analyses portant sur des domaines spécifiques – vieillissement, psychiatrie…

Benoit Majerus

Since January 2011, I am working as Associate Professor at the University of Luxembourg. I have written my PhD on the occupation of Belgium during World War One and World Two. In 2013 I published a history of psychiatry in the 20th century from below. I am also co-editor of h-madness.

More Posts

Les personnes âgées en psychiatrie : une perspective historique

* Ce texte paraît aujourd’hui, sous une forme légèrement différente, dans la revue forum qui publie un numéro consacré aux Menschenrechte in der Pflege.

« Personnes âgées » et « psychiatrie » : voilà deux termes qui se croisent depuis 200 ans et qui constituent des repoussoirs l’un pour l’autre. Les personnes âgées et les responsables politiques qui développent des politiques pour ce groupe craignent le côté stigmatisant lié à l’évocation de la psychiatrie. Le vieillissement n’est pas une maladie, et surtout pas une maladie mentale, définie souvent comme persistante et inguérissable. De son côté, la psychiatrie considère les personnes âgées – pour exactement la même raison – comme une population de patients peu valorisante, surtout pendant les périodes historiques où ce champ se définit comme une approche médicale et biologique. Les difficultés thérapeutiques que posent ces patients risquent de marginaliser davantage encore une discipline qui peine à trouver sa légitimité en médecine. Les psychiatres appréhendent l’aspect chronique de ces patients qui occupent des lits, qui semblent incurables et qui sont responsables des mauvaises statistiques.

En même temps, dès sa naissance dans la première moitié du 19e siècle, la psychiatrie est confrontée à la problématique du vieillissement. Les lieux dans lesquels la psychiatrie commence à être exercée et à se construire comme profession, se caractérisent souvent par une population très hétérogène parmi laquelle les personnes âgées constituent une partie non-négligeable. À Luxembourg, l’Hospice Central d’Ettelbrück qui ouvre ses portes en 1855 et qui constitue l’ancêtre de l’actuel Centre Hospitalier Neuro-Psychiatrique, accueille et enferme à ses débuts différentes populations marginalisées.

La rencontre entre « psychiatrie » et « personnes âgées » est d’abord sociale avant de devenir médicale. Ces personnes que la psychiatrie – psychiatres, gardiens, sœurs – rencontre ne sont pas seulement âgées, elles sont le plus souvent également pauvres. Cette population connaît une double origine. Il s’agit d’une part de patients qui sont arrivés jeunes à l’asile et qui n’en sont jamais sortis. Le long séjour (plus de 10 ans) ne constitue pas l’expérience majoritaire des reclus, mais affecte néanmoins un groupe non-négligeable de la population asilaire1. D’autre part, les asiles accueillent des patients qui arrivent dans l’institution pour des problèmes liées spécifiquement au vieillissement : le premier patient de l’Hospice Central à Ettelbrück, un gendarme pensionné, faisait probablement partie de cette deuxième catégorie2. Avant la mise en place de services spécifiques de gériatrie, la psychiatrie est le lieu où sont « déposées » les personnes âgées jugées trop difficiles pour rester dans leurs familles ou dans un service hospitalier normal. Dans une approche quantitative, la psychiatrie reste la réponse institutionnelle pour les personnes âgées, avant que, à partir des années 1960, la multiplication des maisons de repos offre une alternative . Dans un tel contexte, l’asile a surtout une fonction de gardiennage, tous les manuels de psychiatrie s’accordent pour dire qu’au niveau thérapeutique peu de solutions s’offrent.

C’est seulement dans un deuxième temps que la présence des personnes âgées en psychiatrie est définie comme un problème médical. Pendant très longtemps, la démence sera le topo à travers lequel la psychiatrie précise sa position face au vieillissement. Philippe Pinel va « forger » la « démence » en 1785 comme terme médical. Étienne Esquirol affine la nosologie trente ans plus tard en imposant une différenciation accrue : il distinguera entre la « démence aiguë » et la « démence sénile ». Dans les années 1870, le psychiatre allemand Richard von Krafft-Ebing souligne le caractère traitable de la première et le caractère inéluctable de la deuxième démence. Pendant 70 ans la psychiatrie va surtout utiliser ce terme nosologique pour parler des personnes âgées. Le psychiatre anglais Charles Mercier qui a rédigé un manuel psychiatrique ayant connu plusieurs éditions, résume ainsi la pensée dominante de l’époque : la démence est « la condition naturelle de l’homme dans ses années déclinantes » et elle est inévitable si la mort est le résultat « de l’expiration naturelle des forces de la vie, et non pas d’un acte violent ou de la quasi-violence d’une maladie »3. C’est seulement dans les années 1950 que la psychiatrie va diversifier sa nosologie concernant les personnes âgées. Si elle ne joue pas un rôle central dans la naissance de la gérontologie aux États-Unis ou en Europe, elle deviendra par la suite un acteur important dans ce nouveau champ. En 1955, le psychiatre anglais Martin Roth publie son article séminal The Natural History of Mental Disorders in Old Age dans lequel il propose cinq catégories : psychose affective, psychose sénile, paraphrénie, confusion aiguë, psychose artériosclérotique. Cet article n’est pas seulement intéressant parce qu’il reconnait une autonomie à certains diagnostics auparavant subsumés sous psychoses sénile ou artériosclérotique. Il est également révélateur d’un changement d’optique : d’une approche basée sur un modèle psychodynamique, Roth passe à un paradigme qui accorde beaucoup plus d’importance à la neuropathologie4.

Cette évolution qui touche plus largement la psychiatrie est particulièrement visible dans l’essor que prend le diagnostic de la maladie d’Alzheimer. « Découverte » dans les années 1900 par le psychiatre allemand Alois Alzheimer, la démence présénile caractérise dans un premier temps des personnes qui ne sont pas considérées comme vieillissantes, mais qui présentent néanmoins des symptômes similaires à la démence, la maladie (psychiatrique) par définition du vieillissement. Le psychiatre allemand accorde une place importante à une explication neurologique : des déformations du tissu cérébral sont la cause de la maladie. Pendant cinquante ans, cette description pathologique ne sera guère utilisée, ni dans la nosologie psychiatrique ni dans le language courant. Dans la deuxième édition du Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-II) de 1968, la bible nosologique de la psychiatrie, quelques lignes à peine sont consacrées à la démence présénile, lignes dans lesquels le nom d’Alzheimer apparaît deux fois. Vingt ans plus tard, la quatrième édition a gagné en épaisseur, mais accorde beaucoup plus d’attention à la « maladie d’Alzheimer » : elle est maintenant devenue une entrée propre et sa description occupe cinq pages.

Tableau – Part du mot « Alzheimer » dans le corpus anglais des textes scannés par Google (requête effectuée le 5 avril 2012)

Encore élément marginal dans la nosologie psychiatrique des années 1960, la maladie d’Alzheimer est devenue une description centrale dans les années 1980 jusqu’à devenir presque synonyme de maladie mentale pour personnes âgées, situation paradoxale vu qu’Alois Alzheimer l’avait justement réservée à des personnes qui n’étaient pas encore considérées comme vieilles : la première personne diagnostiquée comme telle, Auguste Deter, avait 51 ans. La différenciation nosologique est symptomatique d’un changement d’optique : les personnes âgées ne souffrent plus des conséquences inévitables du vieillissement mais d’une maladie spécifique.

À partir de l’entre-deux-guerres, la gérontologie commence à se développer comme nouveau champ interdisciplinaire s’occupant du vieillissement, d’abord aux États-Unis, puis à partir de l’après-1945 également en Europe. Dans un premier temps, on y retrouve surtout des endocrinologues, des physiologistes, des cardiologues…

Tableau 2 – Articles publiés dans le Journal of Gerontology par domaine de recherches5

1946

1947

1948

1949

1950

1951

1952

1953

Biologie/Médecine (utilisant des animaux)

13

9

4

4

4

6

10

6

Biologie/Médecine (utilisant des humains)

10

10

14

20

20

13

21

28

Sciences Sociales

8

2

5

5

6

10

11

10

Psychologie/Psychiatrie

0

2

1

4

2

2

2

5

La presqu’absence de psychiatres dans les revues fondatrices du champ ne signifie néanmoins pas l’absence du champ : dans le premier numéro de la nouvelle revue de gérontologie française qui voit le jour en 1976 six des 18 publicités sont consacrées spécifiquement à la psychiatrie6. Malgré l’ancienneté de la pratique thérapeutique des personnes âgées, la psychiatrie en tant que discipline montrera donc une certaine réticence à revendiquer un savoir-faire pour cette problématique sociétale. Dans les derniers 40 ans on observe néanmoins une institutionalisation des psychiatres qui s’intéressent spécifiquement au vieillissement. The Faculty of the Old Age Psychiatry auprès du Royal College of Psychiatry a été fondée en 1973. En 1982 se crée l’International Psychogeriatric Association (IPG). En Allemange, c’est en 1992 que se constitue la Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gerontopsychiatrie und –psychotherapie. Ces trois exemples illustrent à travers le flottement sémantique la fluidité d’un champ qui est en train de se construire. L’organisation anglaise est clairement limitée aux psychiatres. L’IPG réunit psychologues et psychiatres. L’association allemande connaît une définition plus large.

Pour conclure, revenons à l’institution où « psychiatrie » et « personnes âgées » se sont rencontrées : l’asile. Lors des derniers cinquante ans, on assiste dans de nombreux pays européens à une sortie des personnes âgées des institutions psychiatriques. Ce mouvement s’inscrit dans un développement plus large qui vise à quitter l’enfermement asilaire. Dans certains pays comme la Grande-Bretagne, cette politique a conduit à la fermeture de la plupart des grands asiles. Dans d’autres pays comme la Belgique, les grandes institutions ont diminué le nombre de leurs lits et des organisations complémentaires extra-hospitalières sont mises en place. Comme les personnes âgées occupaient un nombre important de ces lits – dans la Grande-Bretagne du début des années 1970 la moitié des patients en hôpital psychiatrique a plus de 65 ans7 – toute une panoplie de nouvelles institutions qui gèrent les différents degrés d’autonomie des personnes âgées voient le jour. Le Luxembourg a été touché tardivement par ces changements. Ce n’est que depuis six ans qu’à l’intérieur du Centre Hospitalier Neuro-Psychiatrique on spécifie institutionnellement l’approche thérapeutique en distinguant entre un service proprement psychiatrique, un service accompagnant les personnes âgées et un service dédié aux personnes présentant un handicap mental.

  1.  Dans l’Angleterre de la fin du 19e siècle, 10% des patients séjournent plus de 3 000 jours dans les asiles : Joseph Melling and Bill Forsythe, The Politics of Madness the State, Insanity and Society in England, 1845-1914 (London; New York: Routledge, 2006), p. 138. []
  2. Jean-Marie Majerus, ‘Das Centre Hospitalier Neuro-psychiatrique’, in Handbuch Der Sozialen Und Erzieherischen Arbeit in Luxemburg, ed. by H. Willems and others (Luxembourg: Saint-Paul, 2009), pp. 113–125 (p. 117). []
  3. Charles Mercier, Sanity and Insanity : with Illustrations (London: W. Scott, 1890), p. 370. Ce manuel, hébergé par Gallica, est accessible ici. []
  4. Jesse F. Ballenger, Self, Senility, and Alzheimer’s Disease in Modern America : a History (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006), pp. 53–54. []
  5. H.W. Park, ‘Refiguring Old Age: Shaping Scientific Research on Senescence, 1900-1960’ (University of Minnesota, 2009), p. 327. Pour télécharger ce travail, cliquez ici. []
  6. Benoit Majerus, ‘Defining Geriatrics’, a Notebook, 2012 [accessed 2 April 2012]. []
  7. Claire Hilton, ‘The Provision of Mental Health Services in England for People over 65 Years of Age, 1970—78’, History of Psychiatry, 19 (2008), 297–320 (p. 297). []

Benoit Majerus

Since January 2011, I am working as Associate Professor at the University of Luxembourg. I have written my PhD on the occupation of Belgium during World War One and World Two. In 2013 I published a history of psychiatry in the 20th century from below. I am also co-editor of h-madness.

More Posts

Defining geriatrics

One of the signs that a new scientific field is in the making is the creation of a scientific journal. In 1976, La Revue de Gériatrie published its first issue. La Revue de Gériatrie was however not a complete “new” scientific journal but the relaunch of La Revue de Gérontologie d’Expression française, a 1963 relaunch of the Revue française de gérontologie founded in 1955. These frequent changes illustrate already the difficulty to define the boundaries of the field. In order to characterise what “geriatrics” are, one can have a look at the members of the editorial board of the journal. Another possibility is to consider the ads placed by the pharmaceutical industry, which became a major actor in defining/financing research and illness after 19451. In the first issue of La Revue de Gériatrie, one finds 18 ads: six for vascular disorders and four tranquillisers.

  1. Quirke Viviane, Collaboration in the pharmaceutical industry : changing relationships in Britain and France, 1935-1965, New York, Routledge, 2008. []

Benoit Majerus

Since January 2011, I am working as Associate Professor at the University of Luxembourg. I have written my PhD on the occupation of Belgium during World War One and World Two. In 2013 I published a history of psychiatry in the 20th century from below. I am also co-editor of h-madness.

More Posts